Thursday, August 02, 2007

They're Trying... Really!!

After the Cavs did nothing in the draft, sources said that the Cavaliers were this close to pulling off trades of Larry Hughes and Eric Snow but it just didn't work out. See, don't be mad that we didn't do anything. We tried! We were so close to trading the two players fans hate the most! (Cynical? Me? Nah...)

Well, the NBA offseason had been pretty lame (and the Cavaliers' offseason still is) until Boston landed KG. Erik thinks that Cleveland fans might get upset that the Cavs didn't trade for Garnett's services (and he's right, they'll get mad, even though the Cavs don't have the cap relief or a young talent like Jefferson to trade).

But don't get angry that Garnett was traded to another Eastern Conference team, the Cavs were trying... we swear:
The Cavaliers were one of a handful of teams that tried to get in on the Kevin Garnett Sweepstakes, an NBA source said, even in the hours before Minnesota finalized the mega-deal that sent Garnett to Boston.

Cleveland, Chicago, Dallas and the Los Angeles Lakers all tried to wedge into the trade with serious offers, the source said, but no team could compete with the Celtics' offer that included potential in Al Jefferson, salary-cap relief in Theo Ratliff's expiring contract and a possible lottery draft pick.

Cavaliers General Manager Danny Ferry declined to comment on specifics of the Cavaliers' off-season maneuvers, but said they are aggressively pursuing avenues to improve. Among those explored, a source said, is mild interest in a potential sign-and-trade deal for Golden State restricted free agent Mickael Pietrus, a 6-6 small forward.
You hear that Cavs fans? Mickael Pietrus! Sure you're mad that the roster hasn't changed. But don't blame Ferry for sitting on his hands, he's out there aggressively pursuing deals! He's trying really really hard! He was after KG too! Til the very end!

All snark aside, here's the thing: I really want the Cavs to mix their roster up this summer. I though it needed it last summer and they really need to do something this offseason. But they're stuck right now. They'll be up against the cap once they sign Varejao and they don't have any expiring deals to trade (and it wasn't like the free agents were all that attractive either). If they want to make a trade they'll have to get really creative, fleece somebody or end up taking some terrible contracts in return.

The problem is. Ferry blew his wad two summers ago on Hughes, Donyell Marshall and Damon Jones. At the time, it didn't seem like that bad of a move, but you can't say that any of those guys have worked out. I can even defend those signings to a certain extent (I don't want to get into the whole Allen or Redd discussion again-they weren't coming here!) based on the Cavs need to show LeBron they were 'serious' about improving before he signed his extension.

They threw money around. They had to do something (I don't see how you can go in 2005-2006 with Ira Newble starting at the 2 and expect LeBron to re-up). It didn't work out. And they are stuck.

Am I expecting some kind of deal to be made this offseason? Yes, but I'm not sure on the size or scope. The last thing I want them to do is trade their current bad contracts for longer bad contracts. I don't want them making a move "just to make a move" (basically, I don't want them overpaying a mediocre point guard who is simply better than Eric Snow).

Needless to say, I'm not holding my breath. But maybe I should be, after all, the Plain Dealer says they're trying.

2 comments:

Erik said...

For whatever it's worth, Brian Windhorst says he expects the Cavs to make a major move before the offseason ends. If Windhorst says it, I'm more inclined to believe it. But, as you said, how that's going to happen is a mystery since the Cavs have no moveable contracts of note, no cap space and Ferry had better not even think of trading away another draft pick. Not after we're finally out of Jiri Welsch's Funhouse.

Again, I think the criticism heaped on Ferry for his 2005 free agent class is misdirected. I'm beating a dead horse here, but Ferry wouldn't have had to use up all that cap space on veterans if Jim Paxson hadn't whiffed on so many draft picks. Building through free agency is a bad idea in any sport, but in '05, it was the only avenue through which Ferry could improve the team.

That's why Ferry must hang onto his draft picks like they're gold from now on. Even if a pick is a bust, it's better to have bust signed for three years and $9 million than a bust signed for five years and $60 million.

Cleveland fans will get upset that Garnett went to Boston. The media is already rubber-stamping the Celtics as conference champs in much the same way they did to Chicago a year ago when they signed Ben Wallace.

I don't buy it, but that's just me. Garnett is a great player, but Ainge acted out of desperation because his job is on the line. It's a high-reward proposition to give up five players and two draft picks for a player like Garnett, but it's also high-risk. Very high-risk. Nobody seems to be paying attention to that angle.

This is the logic of us fans: Danny Ainge, who by all accounts has been awful as Boston's GM, makes a desperate move in an attempt to save his job, and everyone praises him for being bold. Ferry bides his time, and gets accused of having no backbone.

Fans and media don't care if it's a good move or a bad move. They just want to see action. They just want to see sexy names change uniforms.

Erik said...

For whatever it's worth, Brian Windhorst says he expects the Cavs to make a major move before the offseason ends. If Windhorst says it, I'm more inclined to believe it. But, as you said, how that's going to happen is a mystery since the Cavs have no moveable contracts of note, no cap space and Ferry had better not even think of trading away another draft pick. Not after we're finally out of Jiri Welsch's Funhouse.

Again, I think the criticism heaped on Ferry for his 2005 free agent class is misdirected. I'm beating a dead horse here, but Ferry wouldn't have had to use up all that cap space on veterans if Jim Paxson hadn't whiffed on so many draft picks. Building through free agency is a bad idea in any sport, but in '05, it was the only avenue through which Ferry could improve the team.

That's why Ferry must hang onto his draft picks like they're gold from now on. Even if a pick is a bust, it's better to have bust signed for three years and $9 million than a bust signed for five years and $60 million.

Cleveland fans will get upset that Garnett went to Boston. The media is already rubber-stamping the Celtics as conference champs in much the same way they did to Chicago a year ago when they signed Ben Wallace.

I don't buy it, but that's just me. Garnett is a great player, but Ainge acted out of desperation because his job is on the line. It's a high-reward proposition to give up five players and two draft picks for a player like Garnett, but it's also high-risk. Very high-risk. Nobody seems to be paying attention to that angle.

This is the logic of us fans: Danny Ainge, who by all accounts has been awful as Boston's GM, makes a desperate move in an attempt to save his job, and everyone praises him for being bold. Ferry bides his time, and gets accused of having no backbone.

Fans and media don't care if it's a good move or a bad move. They just want to see action. They just want to see sexy names change uniforms.